Tuesday, March 24, 2020

10 Pairs of Similar-Looking Near Antonyms

10 Pairs of Similar-Looking Near Antonyms 10 Pairs of Similar-Looking Near Antonyms 10 Pairs of Similar-Looking Near Antonyms By Mark Nichol Many pairs of words, often but not always etymologically related, can be easily confused for each other though they mean almost the opposite. Distinguish carefully between these odd couples: Contemptible: deserving of contempt, or despicable (â€Å"Their effort to suddenly kiss up to her once she inherited money was contemptible.†) Contemptuous: demonstrating contempt (â€Å"His contemptuous dismissal of the idea was inexcusably rude.†) (Both words stem from the Latin contemnere, â€Å"to despise.†) Flare: a signal light or a similar literal or figurative eruption (The shipwrecked sailor fired a signal flare to attract attention from the passing vessel.†) Flair: talent, or style (â€Å"He’s shown a remarkable flair for the craft.†) (Flare has uncertain origin, but it is not likely related to flair, from the Latin fragrare â€Å"odor.†) Gourmet: an expert on, or one who appreciates the nuances of, food or drink (â€Å"His reputation as a gourmet rests on his familiarity with all the best restaurants.†) Gourmand: a person enthusiastic about good food and drink; glutton (â€Å"My neighbor the gourmand has pretensions of being knowledgeable about wine.†) (Gourmet is from the French grommet, â€Å"boy servant,† perhaps itself based on English groom; gourmand derives from the Middle French gourmant. In French, gourmand remains a close synonym of gourmet, with no negative connotation.) Incredible: inspiring disbelief, extraordinary (â€Å"The fact that she had survived the ordeal was incredible.†) Incredulous: disbelieving (â€Å"I looked at him with a gaze of incredulous wonder.†) (Both words are from the antonym of the Latin credibilis, â€Å"credible.†) Mantel: a shelf or supporting structure above a fireplace (â€Å"She approached the fireplace and placed the candelabra on the marble mantel.†) Mantle: a literal or figurative cloak, covering, or layer (â€Å"A mantle of authority lay on the chieftain’s broad shoulders.†) (Both words derive from the Latin mantellum.) Material: matter, or components (â€Å"She brushed up against an object covered with soft material.†) Materiel: supplies and equipment, especially used by a specific organization (â€Å"The army found itself running low on materiel as its supply lines were cut.†) (Both words come from the French materiel.) Ordinance: order or law, or established usage (â€Å"The ordinance went into effect on January 1.†) Ordnance: artillery, or weapon-related military supplies (â€Å"The fort was equipped with enough ordnance to withstand several regiments.†) (Both words stem from the Latin ordinare, to put into order.†) Temerity: recklessness (â€Å"My assistant had the temerity to suggest that I didn’t know how to do my job!†) Timidity: lacking in courage or boldness (â€Å"Her timidity about approaching him resulted in another missed opportunity.†) (Temerity is from the Latin temere, â€Å"blindly†; timidity derives from the Latin timere, â€Å"fear.†) Troop: a military unit or similar group (â€Å"The outnumbered troop retreated in the face of overwhelming firepower.†) Troupe: a theatrical group or other collection of entertainers (â€Å"Stratford was often visited by traveling troupes of professional actors.†) (The first word is a variant of the second, a Middle French word meaning â€Å"company† and related to the Germanic thorp, â€Å"village,† which survives in English place names as spelled or, more often, as thorpe.) Venal: mercenary, corrupt (â€Å"His approach to business is purely venal.†) Venial: forgivable, excusable (â€Å"I consider envy a venial sin.†) (Venal derives from Latin the venum, â€Å"sale†; venial comes from the Latin venia, â€Å"pardon.†) Want to improve your English in five minutes a day? Get a subscription and start receiving our writing tips and exercises daily! Keep learning! Browse the Misused Words category, check our popular posts, or choose a related post below:50 Handy Expressions About HandsHow to Punctuate Descriptions of ColorsContinue and "Continue on"

Friday, March 6, 2020

Protein Synthesis Essays

Protein Synthesis Essays Protein Synthesis Essay Protein Synthesis Essay In order to understand 1) protein synthesis, or the production of proteins, it is important to understand RNA and how it is transcribed from DNA. And in order to understand 2) transcription, or the process by which genetic information is copied from DNA to RNA, it is important to understand both the structure and replication of DNA, which is the source of the genetic information that tells cells which proteins to make and when to make them. A DNA molecule is made up of two long chains of nucleotides, which are the basic structural units of nucleic acids. One nucleotide consists of three parts: a sugar molecule, called 3) deoxyribose, a phosphate group, and a 4) nitrogen-containing base. The two nucleotides are covalently bonded together between the deoxyribose and phosphate molecules. A key concept to also understand is that there are four kinds of nitrogen-containing bases. This is important because they bond with each other by means of hydrogen bonds in a way that forms the 5) double helix shape of DNA and the way they pair led to suggestions of how DNA copies itself. The four kinds of nitrogen-containing bases are 6) adenine, 7) guanine, 8) cytosine, and 9) thymine. 10) Base-pairing rules are two rules that describe how these bases: they state that cytosine bonds with guanine and adenine bonds with thymine. These two pairs of bases are known as 11) complementary base pairs. Because protein synthesis requires RNA, and RNA comes from DNA, there must be enough DNA to produce RNA. The process in which DNA is copied is called 12) replication. Replication occurs when the two nucleotide chains of DNA separate by unwinding, and each chain serves as a template for a new chain. During replication, enzymes called 13) helicases separate DNA’s two chains of nucleotides at the 14) replication fork. Other enzymes, called 15) DNA polymerases, bind to the separated chains, and one at a time construct a new complementary chain of nucleotides based on the sequence of the nitrogen-containing bases. When replication is completed, there are two new exact copies of the original DNA molecule, both of which consist of one new nucleotide chain and bonded to a nucleotide chain from the original DNA. On the off chance that there is a slight change in the nucleotide sequence, which is known as a 16) mutation, a cell may have serious effects. The DNA may be damaged, and it would not produce the correct RNA, which would then cause a production of incorrect proteins, or a deficiency of proteins that are needed. However, the number of errors and mutations in DNA replication is reduced proofreading and repairing by certain enzymes. In eukaryotes, the genes directing protein production are in the nucleus, but the building blocks for enzymes and amino acids are located in the cytosol. Ribonucleic acid, or RNA, is responsible for the movement of genetic information from the DNA in the nucleus to the cytosol where protein synthesis occurs. RNA, like DNA, is composed of repeating nucleotides. However, RNA is structurally different from DNA in a few ways. Instead of the sugar molecule a molecule being deoxyribose like it is in DNA, the sugar molecule of RNA is just 17) ribose. Another difference between DNA and RNA is their nitrogen-containing bases. DNA has thymine, but RNA has 18) uracil instead of thymine. A third difference between DNA and RNA is that some forms of RNA are made up of a single nucleotide chain, whereas every DNA molecule consists of two chains of nucleotides. RNA exists in three types: 19) messenger RNA (mRNA), which carries genetic information from the DNA to the cytosol, 20) transfer RNA (tRNA), which binds to certain amino acids, and 21) ribosomal RNA (rRNA), which makes up the ribosomes where proteins are made. RNA must carry the genetic information from DNA to the cytosol through transcription. During transcription, an enzyme called 22) RNA polymerase binds to the 23) promoter of a gene. The promoter marks the beginning of the DNA chain to be transcribed. Then, a complementary copy of that gene’s DNA base sequence is made using RNA nucleotides, thus forming the mRNA. Transcription continues as the RNA polymerase continues adding complementary RNA nucleotides until it reaches the 24) termination signal, where the RNA polymerase releases both the DNA and the new RNA. The transcripts that are produced from transcription are the three types of RNA, all of which are involved in protein synthesis. In protein synthesis, the nucleotide sequence of an mRNA molecule is ranslated into a sequence of amino acids using the 25) genetic code, which correlates between a nucleotide sequence and an amino acid sequence. The genetic information needed to make proteins is encoded in a series of three mRNA nucleotides; each of which is called a 26) codon that codes for a specific amino acid. The 27) start codon and the 28) stop codons, however do not code for specific amino acids. The start codon, AUG, engages a ribosome to start translating an mRNA molecule, and the stop codons cause the ribosome to stop translating an mRNA. 9) Translation, which is the process of assembling polypeptides from information encoded in mRNA, begins when the mRNA exits the nucleus through nuclear pores and migrates to a ribosome in the cytosol. The tRNA molecule transports freely floating amino acids to the ribosomes and adds a specific amino acid to the polypeptide chain as each codon is sequentially paired with its 30) anticodon, a region of tRNA that consists of three bases complementary to the codon of mRNA. The assembly of a polypeptide starts when a ribosome attaches to AUG, the start codon on an mRNA transcript. The pairing of an anticodon with a codon causes the specified amino acid to attach to the previously translated amino acid, and therefore create a growing polypeptide chain. When the ribosome reaches a stop codon, translation is brought to an end and the mRNA is released from the ribosome and the polypeptide is complete. Protein synthesis is important because through carrying out the genetic information encoded in an organism’s DNA, the amount and kind of proteins that are produced in a cell determine the cell’s structure and function.

Tuesday, February 18, 2020

The Effect Of Temperature On Rate Of Photosynthesis Of Pondweed Plant Coursework

The Effect Of Temperature On Rate Of Photosynthesis Of Pondweed Plant - Coursework Example Literal meaning of photosynthesis is â€Å"to put together by light†. It is a process that involves capturing sunlight, in the presence of chlorophyll, CO2, water, and then producing starch and oxygen. This starch is then used by the plants either to produce energy, for storage, or to build them into a complex material and then producing starches, oils and proteins. Starch is the best way to store carbohydrates as it is compact and is easily broken down in the body. During the process of photosynthesis plants fix environments CO2 and release oxygen, which is essential for entire living beings for survival. Thus, more than 80% of plant material is synthesized by photosynthesis including respiration process also depends on its byproducts. Chlorophyll is the chemical, which traps light energy and then uses it to synthesize carbohydrates. It acts as catalysts to speed up the process of reaction. Chlorophyll is present in the chloroplasts of the palisade layer of leaves. The equati on for photosynthesis is: 6CO2+6H2O => C6H2O6+6O2 +energy Photosynthesis involves trapping of CO2 from the environment in the presence of Chlorophyll and the sunlight. If a light source is placed near the pondweed plant that acts as sunlight, then the plant will release more oxygen due to splitting of water molecule into hydrogen and Oxygen molecule. The Hydrogen molecule that is released in the process will then combine with the CO2 and produces carbohydrates. This process again gives off more oxygen. The whole process needs to be catalyzed by enzymes to speed up the reaction. Photosynthesis is a two phase procedure. Stage one is light reliant and it captures sunlight to manufacture high energy molecule. In the second phases, which are light free reactions, these molecules are used to incarcerate CO2 and convert them into originators of carbohydrates. There are various limiting factors that affect the rate of photosynthesis. Most important factor is the presence of CO2 in the envir onment i.e., 0.03% to 0.04%. Only at a certain rate can a plant takes up CO2 and proceeds with photosynthesis. Light intensity will also affect the rate as well as temperature. In laboratory experiments, volume of oxygen released per minute is used to determine the rate of the process, and this in turn can be used as the source for determining the effects of limiting factors (Kent, 2000). The law of limiting factor states that, â€Å"When a process depends on more than one factor to be favorable then its rate is limited by the factor at its least favorable value. For a process to go at its maximum rate, all factors need to be at an optimum stage.† Measurement of photosynthesis rate is required to determine the limiting factors that can affect productivity of the process as well as its response to environmental stresses. Most of the measurement techniques being used today involve the gaseous exchange of the plants as an indicator for the rate. Chemical pathway of intake of CO2 and water discharge is the same and hence these two pathways are involved in measurement of photosynthesis through stomata conductance and transpiration method (MILLAN, GUEVARA, TORRES, OSORNIO, 2009). These days modified methods are being used to conduct the analysis, which increases the precision and accuracy of the results. The purpose of this experiment is to determine the effect of temperature on the photosynthesis of pondweed plant. Basically, temperature does not pose an enormous effect on the rate of photosynthesis individually; it only affects the speed of the process by affecting the rhythm of chemical responses in the plants. This is because photosynthesis is a

Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Training needs analysis Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3750 words

Training needs analysis - Essay Example Training needs analysis involves assessing the needs of the Hospital Services Advisors, through a training programmme and evaluating the training needs analysis. The organisation which will be the focus of such a process is Ramsay Health Care UK. RAMSAY HEALTH CARE UK The founding of Ramsay Health Care (RHC) was back in 1964. The company has developed, and has over 117 hospitals. Furthermore, it has day surgery amenities in France, Australia, Indonesia, and United Kingdom. This made the organisation assume the status of a global private healthcare operator. In England, the company obtained Capio UK and its group of hospitals in 2007. By September 2010, RHC had employed more than 3500 employees, making it the top health care providers in the UK. This achievement provided a solid foundation for expansion. The company benefits from its established trade name because of its wide spread network. It competes effectively with regional players. Currently the RHC is in a lasting affiliation with the National Health Services (NHS), where it provides surgical and diagnostics services to both private and self-sponsored patients. In the year 2010, RHC had a 10% augmentation of revenue after getting revenue of 350.2 million in the 2009 financial year. During the Medibank Private Menders’ Survey, RHC was ranked among those who had the top honors. Moreover, RHC was also among the five finalists of the best Health and Wellbeing Strategy in the Australian Human Resource Award. Furthermore, it has an excellent ability to satisfy its customers’ needs. For this reason, it has constantly emerged the top three after rating the two hundred service companies in the private and public sectors. There has been an escalation of birth rates, growth of outpatients’ treatment and the increase of the ageing people. Consequently, the economic environment and the demand for private health care are steadily escalating. This forces the RHC to expand its hospitals in the UK so as to succeed in catering the needs of the public. Additionally, RHC has successfully maintained satisfaction for its staff by ensuring that the proper work place health and protection risks are on check. Consequently, RHC has had a reduction of the time wasted because of injuries. The aim of RHC is to be at the top in offering the highest quality clinical services among the private healthcare hospitals. Furthermore, the organisation responds to the requirements of its patients by providing the best customer services. For them to meet their objectives, the RHC conducts an operation measure every year toward improving the patients’ experiences, and clinical effectiveness. Additionally it acknowledg es the importance of investing in human capital. Therefore, this has been the reason for its current achievements and developments. Moreover, the RHC offers scholarships to its staff who wishes to further their studies. For example, the company recently offered sixty thousand dollars for the staff to pursue postgraduate at its will. The strengths of the organization incorporate its wide network since it has several outlets that offer the necessary services to the clientele base. This enhances its ability to compete within the health industry. Furthermore, its personnel are well versed with operational processes making it simple to embrace emerging technologies that enhance their skills. An additional strength pertains to the organization’s ability to attain increased revenues as illustrated in the financial outcomes. The most significant weakness arises from the inability to determine the patient’

Sunday, January 26, 2020

Company Communication Issue

Company Communication Issue Intro. Since 2013 the company has received reports that some consumers may not be pleased with Huggies diapers because they felt scary due to a supposed chemical burn on the skin. I as the chief communication director have instructed the public relations department to do a media content analysis in order to determine the real situation or impact. Through content analysis, we will be able to do a qualitative research focusing on the interpretation of some editorials, magazines, websites, blogs, social media, forums, etc. Content analysis is the systematic and objective categorizing of information, in public relations, this is used to measure the amount of media coverage and the nature of that coverage (Wilcox, Cameron, Reber, 2014). Content analysis enables public relations departments to reinforce responsive communication by including some factors such as the percentage of favorable, neutral, negative mentions about a company, a brand or service, the overall tone of mention, the percentage of articles that contain a key message point that some organization wants to communicate (Wilcox, Cameron, Reber, 2014). Body. After a study carried out through different sources, the public relations department took a sampling of media data categorized by type as follows. Conclusions. The problem is that there are reports of some websites that express complaints from some customers that the honeycombs are causing burns due to some chemical component. Actually, according to the media content analysis made, no conclusive evidence has been found this is really happening. Instead, the findings show that the brand has been gaining the trust of the final consumers over time. Kimberly-Clark Corp has been interested in innovation, earning some awards. The brand has educational programs for the use of the product in order to prevent misuse. They enforce the campaign about their passion for helping all babies, especially the smallest and most fragile like premature ones. The findings reaffirm that the company is doing a great positive publicity job for the brand, raising it to the second level of popularity in the United States. This work is reflected in sales portals such as diapers.com in which consumer feedbacks reflect an 85% satisfaction with the brand. I do not think these complaints will affect the brands prestige or its positioning in the market, I think the brand is strong enough to deal with it. I would recommend to the CEO to keep the eyes on these forums so that we follow up the possible increase of these complaints, and can proactively prevent any damage to the brand. At the moment it is not recommended to invest more than what is done so far in some positive image campaign to counter these rumors. Reference sources page Wilcox, D. L., Cameron, G. T., Reber, B. H. (2014). Public relations: Strategies and tactics (11th ed.). Boston, MA, United States: Pearson College Div. Huggies snug and drydont use!! (2015, February ). Retrieved February 16, 2017, from What to Expect, http://www.whattoexpect.com/forums/february-2015-babies/topic/huggies-snug-and-dry-dont-use.html Home. (2013, May 11). Chemical burns from huggies.. Retrieved February 16, 2017, from Baby Center Community, http://community.babycenter.com/post/a45616222/chemical_burns_from_huggies. Huggies launches pull-on diaper. (2011). Nonwovens Industry, 42(8), 12. Huggies continues efforts to diaper babies in needs. (2012). Nonwovens Industry, 43(1), 14. PR, N. (2017, February 1). New Huggies Brand Diaper Innovation to Help the Smallest Babies. PR Newswire US. Kimberly-Clark, Skymark Develop Huggies Four-Pack. (2016). Nonwovens Industry, 47(12), 21. Huggies Pull-Ups get potty training liner. (2015). Grocer, 238(8204), 37. tiffanyg. (2013, July 18). Huggies little movers diapers. Retrieved February 16, 2017, from Diapers.com, https://www.diapers.com/p/huggies-little-movers-diapers-331811?sku=KC-856qid=4105292032sr=1-2 PEOPLE. (2015). Caribbean Business, 43(26), 42.

Saturday, January 18, 2020

Ess (Exam Scheduling System)

CHAPTER IV Presentation of Data, Software Product Analysis and Implementation The Existing System Dean 0 Manual Process Administrator Day of ExamSchedule Time Term Rooms Teachers Subjects Sections Figure 4. 1 Process of the Manual Scheduling The figure shows the existing system of AMA Computer College Lipa. The administrator will gather the data needed for the manual process of Scheduling. After gathering the data the administrator will manually do the schedule. The Proposed System 0 Computerized Scheduling Dean Administrator File MaintenanceSchedule Schedule Management Figure 4. Process of the Proposed System The figure shows the content of the proposed system. Once the user entered to the system, the system is ready to accommodate the File Maintenance, Schedule Management, Schedule Browser and Reports. Prospective User The Administrator will act as the primary user of the proposed system. The primary user has access to all the features of the system which includes file maintenance, schedule managing, schedule browsing and generating reports. The primary user can add, edit, update and delete different transactions of all the features mentioned above.The user also allows to print all the reports that was produced by the system. Components of the Proposed System In Software Product Analysis in Chapter III, the proponents discussed the different possible software that can be used in making the proposed study. Among all those software, the proponents decided to chose the SQL server 2008 for database, and Visual Basic . Net 2005 as the programming language. The proponents prefer to use the SQL Server 2008 over other databases it provides much faster Full-Text Search capability and much faster processing once SQL Server 2008 features are used.In addition, SQL Server 2008 provides for more efficient storage of data and indexes including filtered indexes, wide tables, sparse columns, and page level compression. In terms of programming language use, the proponents used Visual Basic. Net 2005 because the Visual Basic. Net is one of the most popular languages used in the software development industry. VB. Net provides managed code execution that runs under the Common Language Runtime (CLR), resulting in robust, stable and secure applications. VB. NET is free threading against theVB single-threaded apartment feature. All features of the . NET framework are readily available in VB. NET. VB. NET is totally object oriented. This is a major addition that VB6 and other earlier releases didn't have. Security has become more robust in VB. NET. System Design DFD (Data Flow Diagram) is used by the proponents to show the graphical representation of the flow of data through the system. This is also used in visualizing of data processing. The context is the summary of DFD of the existing and proposed Data Flow Diagram (DFD).This is the commonly used system modeling tools, particularly for the operational system in where the functions are paramount important and more complex than the data that system manipulates. The context is the summary of the Data Flow Diagram (DFD) of proposed system. The DFD (Data Flow Diagram) is shown in figure 4. 1 Data Flow Diagram of the Proposed System Level 0 1. 0 Course Year Section Rooms Subject Teacher 3. 0 Generate Reports 2. 0 Process Schedule for Term Dean Administrator Processed Schedule Schedule Figure 4. 3 Level 0 of Data Flow Diagram Figure 4. 3 shows the overview process as a whole.It starts from the Admin, the user, with corresponding data that goes to different menus provided by the system. These are basically the primary inputs to be processed by the system which creates reports. This diagram is mainly the representation of the software developed. Level 1 of Process 1: File Maintenance 1. 1 Add Course Dean | | | | | | | | | | | | | 1. 2 Add Year | | | | | | | | | | | 1. 3 Add Rooms | | | | | | | | | | | | 1. 4 Add Subjects | | | | | | | 1. 5 Add Teachers 1. 6 Add Section Figure 4. 4 Level 1 of Da ta Flow Diagram The diagram Level 1 shows the procedure of accessing the file maintenance.The diagram shows how to add, edit, update and delete a data. It provides space for the user to input new data to the database. Level 2 Process 2: Schedule Management | | | | | | 2. 1| | | | 2. 2| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | DEAN| | School Year| | | | Filled up| | | | | | Saved| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Fill up| Schedule| | Update| | | D6 Schedule| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Year| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | schedule| | | | schedule| | | | | | | | Section| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Subject List| form| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Room| | | | | | | Updated| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Day| | | | | | | Schedule| | | | | Time| Schedule| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 2. 3| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Schedule| | | | Print Report| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | STUDENTS| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Figure 4. 5 Level 2 of Data Flow Diagram The diagram Level 2 shows the procedure of accessing the Schedule Management. The user will fill up the schedule form. After making the schedule, the user can also print the report. Level 3 Process 3: Generate Reports| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | D7| Schedule| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Saved Schedule| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Section Schedule| | | | | | | 3. 2| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | 3. 1| | | | | | | | | | | | DEAN| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Generate Schedule| | | | | Generate Room| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Section Reports| | | | | | Schedule Reports| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Room Schedule| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Schedule| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |Students Figure 4. 6 Level 3 of Data Flow Diagram The diagram Level 5 shows the corresponding procedures that the system provides under the report button. It shows the section schedule and room schedule reports. System Evaluation Report The respondents of this study responded so well throughout the survey process. The proponents got a good approval of improving the existing system into the proposed one project. Part I. 1. Suitability The system’s appearance is suitable for its use Table 4. 1 SuitabilitySuitability| Number| of| | Percentage of| Angle| size| for Pie| | | Respondents| | respondents evaluating| Chart| | | | | | | | the suitability of the| | | | | | | | | system| | | | 4–Strongly Agree| 200| | | 200/229 x 100 = 87%| 87% of 360Â ° = 320Â °| 3| – Agree| 29| | | 29/229 x 100 = 13%| 13% of 360Â ° = 40Â °| 2| – Disagree| 0| | | 0| 0| | | 1| – Strongly| 0| | | 0| 0| | | Disagree| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Suitability| | | | | | | | | 13%| | | | | | | | | | | Strongly Agree| | | | | | | | | | Agree| | | | | | | | | | 87%| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Figure 4. 1 Pie Chart for System SuitabilityFigure 4. 1 shows that 87% or 200 of the respondents strongly agreed that the system is suitable and 13% or 29 of the respondents agreed in the suitability of the system. 2. Interoperability The system’s ICONs are all working Table 4. 2 Interoperability Interoperability| Number| of| Percentage of| Angle| size| for Pie| | | Respondents| respondents evaluating| Chart| | | | | | | the interoperability of the| | | | | | | | system| | | | 4–Strongly Agree| 199| | 199/229 x 100 = 87%| 87% of 360Â ° = 313Â °| 3| – Agree| 30| | 30/229 x 100 = 13%| 13% of 360Â ° = 47Â °| 2| – Disagree| 0| | 0| 0| | | | – Strongly| 0| | 0| 0| | | Disagree| | | | | | | Interoperability 13% Strongly Agre e Agree 87% Figure 4. 2 Pie Chart for System Interoperability Figure 4. 2 shows that 87% or 199 of the respondents strongly agreed that the system is working and 13% or 30 of the respondents agreed in the interoperability of the system. 3. Compliance The system supports the performance they need. Table 4. 3 Compliance Compliance| Number| of| Percentage of| Angle| size| for Pie| | | Respondents| respondents evaluating| Chart| | | | | | | the compliance of the| | | | | | | | system| | | | –Strongly Agree| 198| | 198/229 x 100 = 86%| 86% of 360Â ° = 310Â °| 3| – Agree| 31| | 31/229 x 100 = 14%| 14% of 360Â ° = 50Â °| 2| – Disagree| 0| | 0| 0| | | 1| – Strongly| 0| | 0| 0| | | Disagree| | | | | | | Compliance 14% Strongly Agree Agree 86% Figure 4. 3 Pie Chart for System Compliance Figure 4. 3 shows that 86% or 198 of the respondents strongly agreed that the system supports the system they need and 14% or 31 of the respondents agreed in the compliance of t he system. Part II 2. System’s Usability The system is easy to use and navigate Table 4. 4 UnderstandabilityUnderstandability| Number| of| Percentage of| Angle| size| for Pie| | | Respondents| respondents evaluating| Chart| | | | | | | the understandability of| | | | | | | | the system| | | | 4–Strongly Agree| 229| | 229/229 x 100 = 100%| 100% of 360Â ° = 360Â °| 3| – Agree| 0| | 0| 0| | | 2| – Disagree| 0| | 0| 0| | | 1| – Strongly| 0| | 0| 0| | | Disagree| | | | | | | Understandability Strongly Agree 100% Figure 4. 4 Pie Chart for System Understandability Figure 4. 4 shows that 100% or 229 of the respondents strongly agreed that the system is easy to understand. . Learnability The system is easy to use and navigate Table 4. 5 Learnability Learnability| Number| of| Percentage of| Angle| size| for Pie| | | Respondents| respondents evaluating| Chart| | | | | | | the learnability of the| | | | | | | | system| | | | 4–Strongly Agree| 198| | 1 98/229 x 100 = 86%| 86% of 360Â ° = 310Â °| 3| – Agree| 31| | 31/229 x 100 = 14%| 14% of 360Â ° = 50Â °| 2| – Disagree| 0| | 0| 0| | | 1| – Strongly| 0| | 0| 0| | | Disagree| | | | | | | Learnability 14% Strongly Agree Agree 86% Figure 4. 5 Pie Chart for System Learnability Figure 4. shows that 86% or 198 of the respondents strongly agreed that the system is easy to use and navigate and 14% or 31 of the respondents agreed in the navigation of the system. Part III – System’s Reliability 1. Accuracy The system gives an accurate output. Table 4. 6 Accuracy Accuracy| Number| of| Percentage of| Angle| size| for Pie| | | Respondents| respondents evaluating| Chart| | | | | | | the accuracy of the| | | | | | | | system| | | | 4–Strongly Agree| 200| | 200/229 x 100 = 87%| 87% of 360Â ° = 313Â °| 3| – Agree| 29| | 29/229 x 100 = 13%| 13% of 360Â ° = 47Â °| 2| – Disagree| 0| | 0| 0| | | | – Strongly| 0| | 0| 0| | | Disagree | | | | | | | Accuracy 13% Strongly Agree Agree 87% Figure 4. 6 Pie Chart for System Accuracy Figure 4. 6 shows that 87% or 200 of the respondents strongly agreed that the system gives accurate output and 13% or 29 of the respondents agreed in the accuracy of the system. 2. Recovery The system has ability to recover form failure. Table 4. 7 Recovery Recovery| Number| of| Percentage of| Angle| size| for Pie| | | Respondents| respondents evaluating| Chart| | | | | | | the recovery of the| | | | | | | system| | | | 4–Strongly Agree| 198| | 198/229 x 100 = 86%| 86% of 360Â ° = 310Â °| 3| – Agree| 31| | 31/229 x 100 = 14%| 14% of 360Â ° = 50Â °| 2| – Disagree| 0| | 0| 0| | | 1| – Strongly| 0| | 0| 0| | | Disagree| | | | | | | Recovery 14% Strongly Agree Agree 86% Figure 4. 7 Pie Chart for System Accuracy Figure 4. 7 shows that 86% or 198 of the respondents strongly agreed that the system has ability to recover form failure and 14% or 31 of the respondents agreed in the recovery of the system. Part IV – System’s Efficiency 1. Resource BehaviorThe system provides an optimum utilization of the resources. Table 4. 8 Resource Behavior Resource| Number| of| Percentage of| Angle| size| for Pie| Behavior| Respondents| respondents evaluating| Chart| | | | | | | the resource behavior of| | | | | | | | the system| | | | 4–Strongly Agree| 195| | 195/229 x 100 = 85%| 85% of 360Â ° = 306Â °| 3| – Agree| 34| | 34/229 x 100 = 15%| 15% of 360Â ° = 54Â °| 2| – Disagree| 0| | 0| 0| | | 1| – Strongly| 0| | 0| 0| | | Disagree| | | | | | | Resource Behavior 15% Strongly Agree Agree 85% Figure 4. 8 Pie Chart for System Resource Behavior Figure 4. shows that 85% or 195 of the respondents strongly agreed that the system provides an optimum utilization of the resources and 15% or 34 of the respondents agreed in the resource behavior of the system. 2. Time Behavior The system responses on time or as needed. Table 4 . 9 Time Behavior Time Behavior| Number| of| Percentage of| Angle| size| for Pie| | | Respondents| respondents evaluating| Chart| | | | | | | the time behavior of the| | | | | | | | system| | | | 4–Strongly Agree| 201| | 201/229 x 100 = 88%| 88% of 360Â ° = 317Â °| 3| – Agree| 28| | 28/229 x 100 = 12%| 12% of 360Â ° = 43Â °| 2| – Disagree| 0| | 0| 0| | | | – Strongly| 0| | 0| 0| | | Disagree| | | | | | | Time Behavior 12% Strongly Agree Agree 88% Figure 4. 9 Pie Chart for System Time Behavior Figure 4. 9 shows that 88% or 201 of the respondents strongly agreed that the system responses on time or as needed and 12% or 29 of the respondents agreed in the time behavior of the system. System Evaluation for AMACC – Lipa Campus Students 1. System’s Functionality Table 4. 10 System’s Functionality Criteria| Strongly| Agree| Disagree| Strongly| Weighted| Rank| | Agree| | | Disagree| Mean| | Suitability| 200| 29| 0| 0| 3. 7| 1| Interoperab ility| 199| 30| 0| 0| 3. 87| 1| Compliance| 198| 31| 0| 0| 3. 87| 2| 2. System’s Usability Table 4. 11 System’s Usability Criteria| Strongly| Agree| Disagree| Strongly| Weighted| Rank| | Agree| | | Disagree| Mean| | Understandability| 229| 0| 0| 0| 4| 1| Learnability| 198| 31| 0| 0| 3. 86| 2| 3. System’s Reliability Table 4. 12 System’s Reliability Criteria| Strongly| Agree| Disagree| Strongly| Weighted| Rank| | Agree| | | Disagree| Mean| | Accuracy| 200| 29| 0| 0| 3. 87| 1| Recovery| 198| 31| 0| 0| 3. 86| 2| 4. System’s Efficiency Table 4. 12System’s Efficiency Criteria| Strongly| Agree| Disagree| Strongly| Weighted| Rank| | Agree| | | Disagree| Mean| | Resource Behavior| 195| 34| 0| 0| 3. 85| 2| Time Behavior| 201| 28| 0| 0| 3. 88| 1| Over-all System Evaluation of AMACC – Lipa Campus Students Table 4. 13 Over-all System Evaluation of AMACC – Lipa Campus Students Criteria| Strongly| Agree| Disagree| Strongly| Weighted| Rank| | Agree| | | Disagree| Mean| | Functionality| 199| 28| 0| 0| 3. 88| 1| Usability| 142| 31| 0| 0| 3. 82| 2| Reliability| 199| 30| 0| 0| 3. 87| 1| Efficiency| 198| 31| 0| 0| 3. 6| 3| Table 4. 26 Verbal Interpretation of Evaluation Result Option| Scale| Verbal Interpretation| 4| 3. 50 – 4. 00| Strongly Agree| 3| 2. 55 – 3. 54| Agree| 2| 1. 55 – 2. 54| Disagree| 1| 1. 00 – 1. 54| Strongly Disagree| | Table 4. 27| | Interpretation of Over-all Evaluation of AMACC – Lipa Campus Student| | | | | Criteria| Weighted Mean| Verbal| Rank| | | Interpretation| | Functionality| 3. 88| Strongly Agree| 1| Usability| 3. 82| Strongly Agree| 2| Reliability| 3. 87| Strongly Agree| 1| Efficiency| 3. 86| Strongly Agree| 3| Average| | Strongly Agree| |

Friday, January 10, 2020

Interpersonal Conflict in the Movie Hitch Essay

This article to me proves to be somewhat true. I do feel that when you are in a relationship with someone you do tend to feel that you know this person well and can understand what the other person is simply saying at that time. When you are the person trying to communicate it should be as clear as possible. Like in the article the man misunderstood what she was saying but he had no way of knowing because if she was hot temperature wise she should have just said it in a way where he would know she meant temperature wise. This could also put a major strain on relationship between people. There would always be arguments or something because you and whoever would never be able to communicate successfully with one another. It would be nothing but miscommunication because you would have thought that you would be close enough to someone appears to create the illusion of understanding more than actual understanding. (U. S. News & World Report) Miscommunication played a major role in something that happen to me one day. We were having a pizza party for the class and we need to buy extra pizza for the teachers because the kids could only eat cheese. The issue was that some did not eat the same type of pizza as others. So, after that a coworker and I decided we wanted supreme and the others wanted chicken pizza. My understanding was that her and I was going half and half on the supreme pizza because when we made the order we both were telling our coworker what we did and did not want on the pizza. As the pizza arrived they gave her a whole pizza and they brought a supreme pizza upstairs which we was trying to figure out who pizza it was because other people was asking for some but we did not want to give it away until we knew who the pizza belonged to. However, after talking to my coworker she stated that the others thought we had just took their pizza to because it was in our class and did not know they were sending people to ask for the pizza because it was in our room but how were we suppose to know. It got me kind of upset and she told me not to worry about it. So later that day in the meeting after school I felt I needed to address the problem and told my coworkers how were we suppose to know the pizza in our room because our class is upstairs and you guys did not want the kids to see that type of pizza because they could not be offered any. They should have told us that they were coming to our room to eat instead of thinking we were trying to take the pizza they bought. From that day forward we made sure that we understand clearly what we are ordering and doing when it comes to lunch time or whatever.